About Us

Katherine Anne Porter School, or KAPS, is a free, open-enrollment charter high school located in Wimberley, Texas. 

KAPS is different from traditional high schools in many ways. As an open-enrollment charter school, we serve students from five counties in Central Texas. Students and families choose KAPS for many reasons including smaller classes, alternative courses, our arts program and an individualized approach to education.

Our students don't always “fit the mold,” and that's one of the reasons they excel at KAPS, where individuality and uniqueness are truly valued. At KAPS, we embrace differences.

Our music and fine arts program is outstanding. Many of our students are gifted musicians and artists that love to share their talents. Our school looks different, too. We invite you to come by, step inside KAPS to visit and see for yourself the beautiful murals and art on our walls.

We have a dedicated, caring team of highly qualified teachers and staff who strive to make our school — and every student in it — a success.

 

Who was our namesake?

Katherine Anne Porter was born near Brownwood, TX in 1890 and moved to Kyle, TX in her early childhood.  She worked as a writer and teacher most of her life in various spots around the United States, Mexico, and Europe.  She wrote articles for a number of magazines and newspapers and published several notable short stories.  In 1962, she published the very popular novel Ship of Fools, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and was later made into a film. She is known as a writer of great clarity, achieving a style of objectivity without sacrificing sensitivity.  Many of her stories used the geographic locales of the South, the Southwest, and Mexico.  Although most of her works were written and published outside of Texas, she is considered one of the state's best and most famous writers. Katherine Anne Porter died in September of 1980.  Her childhood home in Kyle was purchased by a group dedicated to preserving her memory.  That group evolved into the founders of the KAP School, who saw a need for a school focused on the arts in the rural hill country area.